Impacts of Domestic Violence

Domestic violence has far reaching effects on survivors and their children, and various aspects of their lives. It also impacts different groups in different ways. Read below about some of the ways domestic violence effects these groups and survivors’ everyday life.

Children

It is estimated that 10 million children are exposed to domestic violence annually. Children are not just witness to domestic violence, they are survivors too.  Domestic violence is considered one of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) that can impact people for a lifetime. Read more…

Teens

Teens are just beginning to experience and figure out relationships and are especially vulnerable to abuse. These new feelings are exciting and overwhelming, and it can be hard to distinguish between romance and abuse. Teens rely heavily on their peers for information and support, and often share misinformation. They are also avid users of technology and social media, both of which can be used in abusive ways. Read more…

Pets

Pets are highly vulnerable to harm in abusive households and can also be used for abusive purposes against the survivor. Often, survivors stay in abusive homes for fear that their pets will be abused or killed if they leave. Read more…

Reproductive Health

Domestic violence and reproductive health are strongly linked, with violence increasing women’s risk for unplanned pregnancies, and unplanned pregnancies increasing women’s risk for violence. Read more…

Health

Domestic violence can have both immediate and long-term effects on survivors’ health. Abused women are likelier to experience chronic illness—including multiple chronic conditions—even years after abuse has occurred. Read more…

Financial

Financial abuse is a strategy of power and control used by many abusive partners, isolating survivors from resources, rights and choices, and limiting their ability to take charge of their lives or find freedom. Financial abuse occurs in 98% of abusive relationships. Read more…

Housing and Homelessness

Domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness for women and children, and it is estimated that 16% of homeless people are survivors of domestic violence. Among mothers with children experiencing homelessness, more than 80% had previously experienced domestic violence. 63% of homeless women have previously experienced domestic violence. Domestic violence survivors are the largest subpopulation of people experiencing homelessness in Washington State. Read more…

Workplace

Domestic violence has a significant impact on the workplace, affecting company liability, health care costs, and employee safety, productivity and well-being. A study of employed domestic violence survivors found that 74% were harassed by their partner while they were at work. In another study of abusers, 41% had job performance problems and 48% had difficulty concentrating on the job resulting from their abusive behaviors. The CDC estimates that the annual cost of lost productivity due to domestic violence equals over $727 million, with more than 7.9 million workdays lost each year. Read more…

Older Adults

Domestic violence that begins earlier in life can continue as couples grow older. Survivors are even more vulnerable when the abusive partner is also their caregiver. Read more…

People of Color

People of all races, ethnicities and economic situations experience domestic violence. Yet historic trauma, institutional oppression and discrimination—often causing high levels of poverty—have created the conditions for people of color to be especially vulnerable to domestic violence. Read more…

LGBTQ People

People of all sexual orientations and gender identities can experience abuse. Yet discrimination, prejudice and oppression and have created the conditions in which gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, gender queer, intersex and non-binary people can be especially vulnerable to abuse and face greater challenges in trying to leave an abusive relationship. Read more…

Immigrants

Immigrants are especially vulnerable to domestic violence and face big challenges in leaving an abusive relationship. Read more…

 

Subscribe to the Newsletter
Contact Us

New Beginnings
P.O. Box 75125
Seattle, WA 98175-0125

24-hour Help Line: 206.522.9472
Administrative Office 206.783.4520

info@newbegin.org